How to write an inmate support letter

I will also help out financially, with clothing, advice, love, accountability and emotional support.

How to write an inmate support letter

How to Write a Parole Letter By Contributor - Updated June 19, When an inmate is up for parole or if you are the one seeking to be paroled from jail, it is useful to write a letter to the parole board offering information that will help board members make an informed decision.

Your letter should include details about his sentence and plans after parole so the parole review board clearly understands that, upon release, the former inmate will be a productive member of society. A well-written letter that contains specific reasons why the inmate should be paroled, as well as details about past, present and future actions can increase the chance of release.

Properly Address the Letter If you are writing a letter on your own behalf, begin with a heading that includes the date, your full name, the official name of the jail where you are serving your sentence, and the number assigned to you by the Department of Corrections.

how to write an inmate support letter

When you write a letter on behalf of a loved one, the heading should include the date, your name, address, phone number and email address. Skip down two lines and insert your subject line.

If you are the inmate, your subject line should include your name, DOC number, and hearing date. You are writing a formal letter to appointed parole board members, therefore, a respectful way to begin the letter is, "Dear Honorable Members of the Parole Board.

Ensure that each member receives his or her individual copy of the letter. It is unacceptable to explain that you will just find a place to live after release. You must indicate specifically where and with whom the inmate will live once released. Also, explain whether he will depend on public transportation or if there is a car for him to use.

List the agencies the inmate will register with to make himself available for work. Inmates who acquired special skills while in jail may be able to put those to use post-release.

If there is a job waiting for the inmate upon his release, give details about the job, how the inmate obtained employment, and the amount of pay. If you are the inmate, it might be especially impressive is if you have a planned budget for when you start earning money.

In addition, if your voting rights are restored, you will need to register to vote. Also, there are public assistance programs available to inmates who do not yet have a job, such as food stamps and assistance with public transportation.

Briefly Revisit the Past This section of your parole letter might be the toughest thing you ever have to write, whether it is for yourself or someone you believe deserves to be paroled from jail.

Avoid diverting blame for the crime -- accept responsibility and show what rehabilitative efforts you made while incarcerated. Include a short description in the letter, but do not try to portray the inmate as an innocent angel. Spend less than a paragraph describing the past.

If you have completed a GED while incarcerated, include that in your letter, plus any other accomplishments. Likewise, if you participate in support groups within the jail, describe your role and the take-away from that role.You will end the support letter by mentioning how you are going to support the inmate after the Parole is granted.

It can be financial such as place to live, lending a vehicle or granting a job. You also can add how you are going to support the inmate emotionally, such as adjusting the relationship you have with the inmate or advice or words of.

When an inmate is up for parole review, it is useful to have written a letter to the parole board offering information which will help board members make a more informed decision. If you have a loved one who is incarcerated, writing a letter of support can, in some cases, significantly increase the chance of release.

Why Should You Write a Letter of Support? As we said, a well-written and persuasive parole support letter can help sway a parole board’s opinion with regard to a specific inmate. (That is, as long as the inmate has exhibited a variety of other positive traits throughout their sentence, as well.

Jan 10,  · Parole Support Letters: The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

Jan 10,  · Parole Support Letters: The following information, taken from Parole Board guidelines has been published once a year for five years, to benefit family and friends of inmates who write letters to the Board of Pardons and Paroles.

how to write an inmate support letter

When an inmate you know is preparing for a parole hearing, it is often helpful to submit a letter to the parole board on his or her behalf.

An effective letter can be drafted by following a few tips. How to Write a Letter of Support to the Parole Board of TDC | .

Support Letters | Information for Friends and Family of Inmates